“Events such as the OECD Public Forum provide unique opportunities to find common ground on reshaping healthcare for the people and societies of tomorrow”

Safe international trade is essential for the economic growth governments are currently seeking but is threatened by the ever evolving asymmetrical threat of fraud and illicit activity. These crimes, be it through sale of counterfeits, contraband, tax evasion, avoidance of quality controls or theft of intellectual property, damage governments revenues, undermine policies and put at risk public health and citizens well-being. 

©McKinsey

We are so used to all things digital that we can sometimes lose sight of just how enormous the phenomenon has become, and how disruptive it can be. The bit volume of cross-border digital flows has grown by 45 times in the past decade. An estimated 211 terabits of data, which is the equivalent of 8,500 entire Wikipedias, flow across borders every second. Approximately 12% of global consumer goods trade is now conducted via international e-commerce. Some 50 million small companies are now on Facebook alone, double the number in 2013.

©Randstad

"We are the children of a technological age. We have found streamlined ways of doing much of our routine work. Printing is no longer the only way of reproducing books. Reading them, however, has not changed.” Lawrence Clark Powell

©Sodexo

Not so long ago, “globalisation” was a favourite paradigm in international business. It was a trend that began in the late 1970s and accelerated in the 1980s, when corporate takeovers were the order of the day and multinational companies fixated on maximising short-term profits and boosting share prices. One approach was “global sourcing”, also called outsourcing or offshoring. The strategy typically involved moving the company’s operations to wherever labour was cheapest. First the production work went abroad, and then companies were offloading all but their most essential core activities.

"Trinity has produced more entrepreneurs than any other university in Europe."

Interview with Dr Patrick Prendergast, Provost and President, Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin

©AARP

I first stepped onto the stage at AARP’s Ideas@50+ national member event in San Diego in September 2014 to deliver a keynote address urging the 8,000 attendees to disrupt ageing. Since then, the response has been overwhelming. It turns out that this is a message that people aged 50 and over have been waiting to hear. People across the country, from all walks of life, have been sharing their experiences with me and telling me that although they don’t want to age the same way their parents did, they aren’t sure what to do about it. They are anxious to change the conversation in our society, and in some cases, to start having the conversation. They want more choices for how to live when they get older. They want new and better solutions to help them age with independence, dignity and purpose. They are ready to chart a new course. So am I.

I wrote this book to provide a pathway for those who are 50 and over and to create a new vision for all generations for living and ageing in America. I can no more identify with my parents’ experience of ageing than my own kids can identify with mine. It’s just different. Sometimes I play this little game when I hit certain milestones in my life–like birthdays, sending my kids off to college, attending their graduations, etc–I think back and try to remember my parents as they experienced those same milestones. What was my mom like when she was 57? What were my parents doing when I graduated from college? How did they view their lives at various milestones along the way? It can be a real eye opener and really makes me realise how much things have changed from their generation to mine.

©Olivier Martin-Gambier

OECD Business brief

"Electric vehicles are the only practical, affordable solution to our planet’s environmental challenges–and they are available today."

"Even marginal shifts in public policy or human resource design can have a very positive impact on an employee’s current state and healthy retirement prospects."

"Regional authorities in Africa are now getting involved in the fight against climate change by making concrete commitments."

Interview with Jeannot Ahoussou-Kouadio, President of the Assembly of Regions and Districts of Côte d’Ivoire (ARDCI)

Cathríona Hallahan, Managing Director, Microsoft Ireland ©Rights reserved

Ireland has bounced back from the crisis to become one of the OECD’s most dynamic economies. A key help has been the continued inflow of capital investment from abroad, allowing the country to bolster its position as a European hub for the likes of IT, finance, pharmaceuticals, engineering, and more. Ireland has been an attractive destination for global high-value investments for decades, yet its own innovation system lags that of other similar-sized OECD countries. Closing the gap would strengthen the country’s long-term outlook, but how can this be done?

©Shaun Murphy

"The start-up environment is exceptionally dynamic."

Integrated planning, supported by clear public policies, new technologies and ways to safeguard the environment, is the path towards sustainable mobility in cities in Brazil, as elsewhere.

Safe international trade is essential for the economic growth governments are currently seeking, but is threatened by the ever-evolving asymmetrical threat of fraud and illicit activity.

©Technology Agency of the Czech Republic

 

"The number of people employed in R&D has grown by 50% in seven years."

"The OECD and the G20 are moving in the right direction. Their goals are ambitious as they try to modernise the international taxation system. Achieving consensus on fundamental tax issues among so many countries will be a major achievement."

©Randstad

"A real problem for the world economy is the location mismatch between available jobs and employees."

 

"There are many opportunities for lifelong learning available at the click of a button, so why is it that many employers still report a 'skills gap'?"

"Investing in the future while tackling youth unemployment."

"Israel’s successes arise from the continuous need for and support of innovative methods, technologies, holistic water resource management and strategies for sustainably providing for the nation’s water needs."

"Turkish banks have had no difficulty accessing foreign wholesale funding."

"Social perception is a prerequisite for a level playing field among all entrepreneurs."

"Each year about one-third of all the food produced globally ends up wasted even as hundreds of millions of people go hungry."

©Societe Generale

Earlier in 2012 Frédéric Oudéa, Chairman and CEO, Societe Generale Group, met OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría to discuss the global economy, the business scene and the financial crisis. Here is an extract from their conversation. 

A world leader in phosphates and its derivatives, OCP is strongly committed to contribute to a sustainable development of agriculture in Africa and to a real green revolution on the continent.

"The BRVM is the unique stock exchange for eight countries in West Africa: Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal and Togo."

An interview with Nina Alida Abouna, Managing Director of the Investment and Export Promotion Agency (APIEX)

Since its beginnings, the International University of Rabat (IUR) has developed into an increasingly attractive model of innovative teaching, renowned for its professionalism and rigour both nationally and internationally. 

"To strengthen fi nancial stability, a macro-prudential framework was established to ensure that counter-cyclical effects of fi scal policies by the government and further downward trend in capital markets do not affect macroeconomic stability."

 

An interview with Thierno Bocar Tall, CEO of African Biofuels and Renewable Energy Company (ABREC)

Economic data

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