Shailey Hingorani @BurntCognac
What will it take to implement SDGs? @OECDObserver has some ideas: #SDGs #UNGA #GlobalGoals

“Sluggish growth, widening inequality, environmental precariousness, and market volatility–is a sobering reminder of the myriad challenges facing policymakers”, yes, definitely! And yes, of course, it is the OECD’s role to “help design policy packages to improve performance” by promoting “new data, new research, new mindsets”.

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Interesting and up to date overview of all the initiatives taken in recent years to prevent modern slavery. It shows that voluntary initiatives by themselves are not enough to make fundamental changes (not for the first time). The linkage with subsidies and credit schemes, arbitration procedures and campaigns transparency obligations etc. makes these codes of conduct meaningful. 

I had no idea that there were so many tech companies with offices in Ireland. 

“But will they be good jobs?” 

You raise the question of whether the euro could one day become a more important international reserve currency (Observer No 230, January 2002). Yet you omit to mention the Panglossian forecasts of some economic commentators a few years back who had predicted a massive shift of international reserves into the euro and out of the dollar–with a consequent surge of the euro.

Private investment, particularly in infrastructure, is likely to be a key component of development finance going forward.

As we embark on adopting a new development agenda, it is an opportune time to put the spotlight on the plight of millions of women and girls around the world who desperately need access to basic services, decent employment and freedom of choice to live a better quality life. Without money and proper funding, gender equality and women's empowerment will never be fully achieved.

@OECDObserver has produced an excellent @G20Australia special here #G20Brisbane @NassimKhadem @UNSWbusiness #G20 

We at the Commonwealth Youth Sport for Development and Peace Working Group believe that sport can be used as a tool for different types of development, including economic, social and personal development.

With the new forms of employment, we are getting further and further away from equal pay for equal work. And not just between men and women. 

The digital era may well be all about inclusion, but often its long reach is at the exclusion of others ("Philanthropy, digital payments and financial inclusion" in No 301, Q4 2014). 

Most shocking number of #OECD report Education at a Glance 2014: 15% of 15-29 year-olds in OECD R not in a job nor in education or training!

We encourage the OECD and other global bodies to provide greater focus on reporting non-GDP based measures alongside GDP per capita when comparing the progress of nations so that this methodology can become more mainstream.

Former Ambassador Seiichiro Noboru urges the OECD to expand by including the BRIICS* ("Serving a new world" in OECD Observer No 298, Q1 2014). Only when these countries adopt OECD best practices can governments and firms enjoy a true level playing field. As the organisation helps aspiring members to adhere with OECD instruments, important reforms can be pushed forward.

The new public #data portal in beta lets you find, compare and share the latest #OECD stats

At the engine room ( we work to close gaps between advocacy and technology through research and networks.

Climate change is a result of humanity's overuse of resources. Technology cannot undo the damage done, neither can governments nor markets, since in both the prevailing paradigm is growth–being a truly suicidal ideology on a finite planet. 

I have been involved in this discussion for 50 years now and appreciate the points made by both sides ("Ending poverty", However strong their quoted "indicators" may be, the true fact is that all the "political will" in the world has proved to be completely worthless. Having worked in many countries around the world, I know that the biggest barrier to alleviating poverty is corruption.

Congratulations on choosing a photo of the Paris-based Autolib' electric carsharing scheme to illustrate your article on the plight of the car industry in the OECD area ("The automotive sector: Steering beyond the crisis" in No 297, Q4 2013).

Your view of Africa offers encouragement (Africa's century? No 296, Q3 2013). But it is hard to see how countries there can rise up so-called global value chains without some major economies sorting themselves out first.

Our governments should focus on human development, more than in making industry grow, all people should be concerted in changing this way of thinking, because if we just think in terms of growing our industry we won’t care about poor people. 

As I gaze out my window at a very spring-like day in late December, I am well aware of the lack of accustomed snow pack. I am grateful to the scientists and researchers who are investigating strategies that will mitigate the effects of this looming shift in the weather patterns we are complacent to.

When household resources are scarce, children become breadwinners, young girls are married, etc. It is obvious to take into account the child's rights in the well-being measure.

The idea of a "single rate system" as espoused here (VAT's next half century: Towards a single-rate system? No 284, Q1 2011) shows that the author–for that matter the entire OECD–needs to know certain facts.

Lead was also apparently the cause of Beethoven's deafness and death ("Lead and crime", No 295 Q2 2013, "Getting the lead out", online title). But would he have created his late quartets otherwise?

Technology may be one of the factors decreasing the income share in OECD countries, but this is not true for developing countries. Studies show technology spill-overs actually increase income share in developing countries.

Economic data


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