People at the OECD

Page 42 

Kaori Miyamoto

Hi, my name is Kaori Miyamoto, and I work as a senior policy analyst in the Development Co-operation Directorate, currently doing research on policies to mobilise private investment for developing countries. I joined the OECD in 1998 from the World Bank in Washington, DC. This makes me the longest serving Japanese staff member, with 16 years under my belt.

Though I was born in Osaka, I grew up and lived in many countries, including the UK, the US, Sri Lanka and Thailand. I have worked in several countries in Africa too, so I am comfortable with the multicultural environment of the OECD. I also highly value the knowledge sharing and standard setting among developed countries in policy areas such as health, education, employment, tax, pension, gender, consumer issues and many more.

I believe that our countries as well as other global economies can learn from each other and improve their policies back home. In fact, I actually think that by facilitating an open and frank dialogue and co-operation among each other, the organisation not only helps improve people’s lives, but contributes to peace and stability. In other words, our work can promote well-being and hopefully prevent a major world war from breaking out again.

Makoto Miyasako

I am Makoto Miyasako, and I work in Human Resources at the OECD. It has now been six years since I joined the organisation, which makes it the longest period I have spent in one place (school or work) since I was 20 years old. What I appreciate and enjoy most about working here is the capacity of the organisation to allow me continuously to learn and try out new things.

I joined the OECD in 2007 and am currently managing a team in charge of Talent Management and Human Capital strategies. Prior to the OECD, I worked for UN agencies in New York and Copenhagen. I have an MBA from Wharton School where the majority of my classmates went into investment banking to make millions of dollars (I graduated pre-crisis). But I opted to work for international organisations, more specifically in the area of corporate management. There are always highs and lows in the workplace, but it is such a fascinating environment. I am surrounded by colleagues from different backgrounds, with differing viewpoints, all trying to achieve something positive together, even if it is not as easy to measure as a quarterly profit!

Kazuki Motohashi

Hi, my name is Kazuki Motohashi. Japan is celebrating its 50th anniversary as a member country, but I am perhaps one of the organisation’s youngest and newest staffers. I started working in the Environment Directorate of the OECD as a trainee in January 2014. I am involved in policy issues related to water where there is a lively discussion going on about water resource management, financing and public-private partnerships in water, and more. It is an issue which concerns everyone. I applied to the OECD from Japan because I felt I could contribute to better policies for all countries by working with people from diverse backgrounds to come up with good ideas, and solutions that work.

At the University of Tokyo I studied public policy, especially environmental and energy policy, and the OECD has been a great experience, not to mention a great opportunity for my future career.

Yumiko Murakami

My name is Yumiko Murakami and I joined the Tokyo Centre as head in 2013. I am a working mum, with three children. Before joining the OECD I spent 18 years in finance as an investment banker in London, New York and Tokyo. Upon finishing graduate school, before entering the business world, I worked in Cambodia as part of the United Nations Peacekeeping Operation. I am excited to be back in the public sector now and hope to make a difference by applying what I have learned as a business person to the current role.

I realise I could not have come to the OECD at a more exciting moment, with Japan celebrating its 50th anniversary of OECD membership amid a new mood of optimism in the country that many of us have not felt for a long time. More than ever, we are keen to show off the positives of this country, while keeping our feet on the ground and addressing the challenges that lie ahead. At the same time, I am proud to be part of the OECD team working at the interface between the organisation and its second largest member country.

The Tokyo Centre I manage is actively engaged in dialogue with a wide range of stakeholders in Japan and the rest of Asia, in fields that span the entire OECD policy spectrum. The small and effective staff at the Tokyo Centre consists of both new members, who recently joined from the private sector, and old timers, who have been with the OECD for almost two decades. The OECD Tokyo Centre was established on 2 July 1973, nine years after Japan joined the OECD in 1964. Initially, the Tokyo Centre’s activities were focused on marketing of OECD’s publications. Today, we play a critical role as part of the Public Affairs and Communications Directorate in facilitating strategic discussions between the OECD’s headquarters in Paris and Japan, as well as other countries in Asia, particularly Southeast Asia. We promote the OECD’s value added, its role, solidarity in face of the difficult economic, social and environmental challenges that Japan confronts, and determination to work with all member countries to advance better policies for better lives.

We engage with parliamentarians, administrative officials and elected representatives, as well as business and labour leaders. The feedback is impressive, the energy positive. This is particularly the case when we talk to students of all ages, young people with a global outlook who are eager to help build a new, vibrant, open Japan. In honour of Japan’s 50th anniversary at the OECD, the Tokyo Centre has planned many special events for 2014, including the launch of the OECD Student Ambassador Programme and a parliamentarian league called “Friends of OECD”. The Tokyo Centre has been an integral part of the planning and execution of this year’s OECD Forum and Ministerial Council Meeting. Given the importance of Asia for the OECD and Japan, the Tokyo Centre will continue to forge relationships and make new connections with all key players in the regions for our OECD members
and experts.

©OECD Observer No 298, Q1 2014

Economic data


Stay up-to-date with the latest news from the OECD by signing up for our e-newsletter :

Twitter feed

Suscribe now

<b>Subscribe now!</b>

To receive your exclusive print editions delivered to you directly

Online edition
Previous editions

Don't miss

  • Africa's cities at the forefront of progress: Africa is urbanising at a historically rapid pace coupled with an unprecedented demographic boom. By 2050, about 56% of Africans are expected to live in cities. This poses major policy challenges, but make no mistake: Africa’s cities and towns are engines of progress that, if harnessed correctly, can fuel the entire continent’s sustainable development.
  • “Nizip” refugee camp visit
    July 2016: OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría visits the “Nizip” refugee camp, situated between Gaziantep and the Turkish-Syrian border, accompanied by Turkey’s Deputy Prime Minister Mehmet Şimşek. The camp accommodates a small number of the 2.75 million Syrians currently registered in Turkey, mostly outside the camps. In his tour of the camp, Mr Gurría visits a school, speaks with refugees and gives a short interview.
  • OECD Observer i-Sheet Series: OECD Observer i-Sheets are smart contents pages on major issues and events. Use them to find current or recent articles, video, books and working papers. To browse on paper and read on line, or simply download.
  • Queen Maxima of the Netherlands gives a speech next to Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto (not pictured) during the International Forum of Financial Inclusion at the National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico June 21, 2016.
  • How sustainable is the ocean as a source of economic development? The Ocean Economy in 2030 examines the risks and uncertainties surrounding the future development of ocean industries, the innovations required in science and technology to support their progress, their potential contribution to green growth and some of the implications for ocean management.
  • OECD Environment Director Simon Upton presented a talk at Imperial College London on 21 April 2016. With the world awash in surplus oil and prices languishing around US$40 per barrel, how can governments step up efforts to transform the world’s energy systems in line with the Paris Agreement?
  • Happy 10th birthday to Twitter. This 2008 OECD Observer interview with Henry Copeland said you’d do well.
  • The OECD Gender Initiative examines existing barriers to gender equality in education, employment, and entrepreneurship. The gender portal monitors the progress made by governments to promote gender equality in both OECD and non-OECD countries and provides good practices based on analytical tools and reliable data.
  • Once migrants reach Europe, countries face integration challenge: OECD's Thomas Liebig speaks to NPR's Audie Cornish.

  • Message from the International Space Station to COP21

  • The carbon clock is ticking: OECD’s Gurría on CNBC

  • If we want to reach zero net emissions by the end of the century, we must align our policies for a low-carbon economy, put a price on carbon everywhere, spend less subsidising fossil fuels and invest more in clean energy. OECD at #COP21 – OECD statement for #COP21
  • They are green and local --It’s a new generation of entrepreneurs in Kenya with big dreams of sustainable energy and the drive to see their innovative technologies throughout Africa.
  • Pole to Paris Project
  • In order to face global warming, Asia needs at least $40 billion per year, derived from both the public and private sector. Read how to bridge the climate financing gap on the Asian Bank of Development's website.
  • How can cities fight climate change?
    Discover projects in Denmark, Canada, Australia, Japan and Mexico.
  • Climate: What's changed, what hasn't, what we can do about it.
    Lecture by OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría, hosted by the London School of Economics and Aviva Investors in association with ClimateWise, London, UK, 3 July 2015.
  • Is technological progress slowing down? Is it speeding up? At the OECD, we believe the research from our Future of ‪Productivity‬ project helps to resolve this paradox.
  • Is inequality bad for growth? That redistribution boosts economies is not established by the evidence says FT economics editor Chris Giles. Read more on
  • Interested in a career in Paris at the OECD? The OECD is a major international organisation, with a mission to build better policies for better lives. With our hub based in one of the world's global cities and offices across continents, find out more at .

Most Popular Articles


What issue are you most concerned about in 2016?

Euro crisis
International conflict
Global warming

OECD Insights Blog

NOTE: All signed articles in the OECD Observer express the opinions of the authors
and do not necessarily represent the official views of OECD member countries.

All rights reserved. OECD 2016