BlogServer Q2 2016

These extracts from blogs are courtesy of OECD Insights, OECD Education & Skills Today, OECD Ecoscope, Wikigender, Wikiprogress and other content and social media platforms managed by the OECD. 

The doctor will see you now (if you turn on the video)
Mark Pearson

An elderly man with cardiovascular disease tests his own blood pressure, and sends the results to an online application that his doctor can access. Another patient with depression living in a rural area far from health services tells a psychiatrist how he is feeling via a video connection. All of this occurs without the patients leaving their homes.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1pA

Europe’s top 1%: Who they are and how you get in
Oliver Denk

Extreme inequality at the top of the earnings scale has been high and rising in countries around the globe. But who are the select few with the highest labour incomes? And what determines who they are?

From OECD Ecoscope. More here: http://bit.ly/29OOfuG

Africapolis: Measuring urbanisation dynamics in West Africa
Sahel and West Africa Club (SWAC) Secretariat

Africa is the least urbanised continent in the world but an urban transition is very much underway. This is particularly visible in West Africa where the number of urban agglomerations increased from 152 in 1950 to almost 2,000 in 2010. Between 2000 and 2010 alone, the urban population grew by over 40 million people, making towns and cities home to 41% of the region’s total population.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1pu

Resilience of economies to exogenous shocks
Aida Caldera Sanchez and Giuseppe Nicoletti

Countries are subject to economic shocks originating from long-term trends such as demography and short-term events such as financial crises, but healthy economies should be resilient to both. It is important to understand the factors that shape a country’s economic resilience, defined broadly as a country ability to contain long and short-term vulnerabilities as well as its capacity to resist and recover quickly when shocks occur. Ideally, whatever the shock, policies should be such that they help the economy remain close to its welfare potential in a sustainable way, notably in terms of jobs, incomes and quality of life.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1pv

Understanding and managing the unequal consequences of environment pressures and policies
Shardul Agrawala and Rob Dellink

The consequences of degradation of environmental quality as well as the consequences of environmental policies are typically unevenly distributed. In general, poorer countries and lower income households are more severely affected by environmental degradation and at the same time have less capacity to adapt.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1pw

The rise of the robots–friends or foes for developing countries?
Johannes Jütting and Christopher Garroway

In January, the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland saw members of the global elite extolling the virtues of the so-called “4th industrial revolution”. The catch-all term, also known as “Industry 4.0,” ties together a wide range of cutting-edge digital technologies–such as 3-D printing, machine intelligence, the internet of things, cloud computing, and big data–into a vision of a future world of work. In this brave new world, smart factories will operate by automation with machines exchanging data seamlessly. The consequences for the work force in both developing and developed countries will be huge.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1hS

Learning by heart may not be best for your mind
Alfonso Echazarra

Some of the greatest geniuses had remarkable memories. Mozart, according to legend, sat and listened to Allegri’s “Miserere”, then transcribed the piece of music, entirely from memory, later in the day. Kim Peek, the savant who was the inspiration for the blockbuster film, Rain Man, memorised as many as 12,000 books. But unlike Mozart, who composed more than 600 works during his brief life, Peek was unable to distinguish between the relevant and the irrelevant, or discover hidden meanings and metaphors in the texts he had committed to memory.

From OECD Education & Skills Today. More here: http://bit.ly/29saPEX

We can do better on education reform
Andreas Schleicher

A generation ago, teachers could expect that what they taught would equip their students with the skills needed for the rest of their lives. Today, teachers need to prepare students for more change than ever before, for jobs that have not yet been created, to use technologies that have not yet been invented, and to solve social problems that we just can’t imagine. And many of the world’s social and economic difficulties end up on the doorsteps of schools too.

From OECD Education & Skills Today. More here: http://bit.ly/2a1AYek   

©OECD Observer No 306, Q2 2016




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