BlogServer Q3 2016

These extracts from blogs are courtesy of OECD Insights, OECD Education & Skills Today, OECD Ecoscope, Wikigender, Wikiprogress and other content and social media platforms managed by the OECD.

Economic complexity, institutions and income inequality

César Hidalgo and Dominik Hartmann

Is a country’s ability to generate and distribute income determined by its productive structure? Decades ago Simon Kuznets proposed an inverted-u-shaped relationship describing the connection between a country’s average level of income and its level of income inequality.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1Ah 

Can OECD’s data guide the world towards better education systems?

Dirk Van Damme

What do we have to do to ensure that all children and adults around the world get the best possible education? This question is important not only for individuals’ futures, but also for the fate of the planet. The outcomes of education will determine whether mankind will be able to face the many challenges ahead, from climate change to migration, from peace to economic growth and social progress.

From OECD Education & Skills Today. More here: http://bit.ly/2feDTFZ 

Gender gaps in emerging economies: the role of skills

Paolo Falco

Despite unprecedented progress over the past century, gender gaps in the labour market persist throughout the emerging world and are accompanied by important skill gaps. Most notably, women tend to perform worse in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, have lower financial literacy and business knowledge than men.

From OECD Skills and Work blog. More here: http://bit.ly/2anZD1z 

Creating jobs in the developing world

Elizabeth L. Littlefield

A generation ago, private capital flowing into developing countries was a small fraction of aid dollars. In recent years that ratio of aid to investment has flipped, and the amount of investment flowing to the developing world far exceeds aid dollars. From OECD “Development Matters” platform.

More here: http://oe.cd/1Ai

The new terrorism

Patrick Love

Fifteen years after 9/11, the world is now facing the threat of systemic terrorism. Apparently mindless, random attacks are in fact part of a strategy developed over a number of years, whose origins can be traced back to three major turning points, one ideological, one political, one military, that occurred at the end of the 1970s.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1Ak

From rote learning to robotics

Fabien Dworczak

A session at the 2016 OECD Forum entitled “Teaching & Learning with Robots” brought Nao, a humanoid robot, to meet with a class of young students from the Sections Internationales de Sèvres school. Catherine Potter-Jadas, head of the primary school, noted the children’s reactions to the robot.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1Al

Complexity, modesty and economic policy

Lex Hoogduin, University of Groningen and GloComNet

Societies and economies are complex systems, but the theories used to inform economic policies predominantly neglect complexity. They assume for example representative agents such as typical consumers, and they also assume that the future is risky rather than uncertain.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://oe.cd/1C4 

Revisiting policy options for more jobs

Alain De Serres, Head of Division, and Peter Gal, Economist, Structural Surveillance Division, Policy Studies Branch, OECD Economics Department

In many OECD countries, the labour market has yet to recover the lost ground suffered in the aftermath of the financial crisis. In some of them, unemployment has been persistently high, resulting in a very high incidence of long-term unemployment. In part, this reflects the weakness of demand but given that a slow recovery has been a reality for many countries, a number of structural factors also contribute to the situation in the hardest-hit countries.

From OECD Ecoscope. More here: http://bit.ly/2eCIOfX 

Achieving and sharing the benefits of globalisation

Catherine Mann, OECD Chief Economist, and Ken Ash, Director of the OECD Trade and Agriculture Directorate

The latest OECD Interim Economic Outlook warns that trade growth is slowing, contributing to another slowing of global GDP growth in 2016 and with few signs of improvement for 2017. Does it really matter? If we believe the current anti-trade, anti-globalisation rhetoric, we might shrug our shoulders and say “no”. Trade has been so maligned and demonised, some might even be pleased.

From OECD Ecoscope. More here: http://oe.cd/1CL 

Global growth warning: Weak trade, financial distortions

Catherine Mann, OECD Chief Economist

The global economy remains in a low-growth trap. In our latest Interim Economic Outlook global GDP growth is set to remain flat around 3% in 2016 and improve modestly to 3.2% in 2017. This is slightly lower than the June Economic Outlook forecast due to weaker conditions in advanced economies, including the effects of Brexit, offset by a gradual improvement in major emerging market commodity producers. More significantly, this string of feeble global growth rates is well-below historical norms.

From OECD Ecoscope. More here: http://oe.cd/1CM 

Educating for innovation and innovation in education

Andreas Schleicher, Director, OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

People have quite different views on the role that digital technology can and should play in schools. But we just can’t ignore how digital tools have so fundamentally transformed the world around schools. Students unable to navigate through our complex digital landscape are simply no longer able to participate in our social, economic and cultural life.

From OECD Education & Skills Today. More here: http://bit.ly/2dvo90t    

A new role for science in policy formation in the age of complexity?

Vladimir Šucha, Director General, European Commission, Joint Research Centre

The recent financial crisis was a wakeup call for both scientists and policy makers. It exposed new and unknown links between economic magnitudes but also between various parts of our modern, globalised world. It further helped to reveal the limitations of some approaches in economics as well as social sciences which proved to be unsuitable for this new world.

From OECD Insights. More here: http://bit.ly/2eLfIxv  

©OECD Observer No 307 Q3 2016




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