Today 25 March 2017 marks the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, the agreement that laid the ground for today's European Union, in which people, goods, services and capital can move freely among member states. The European Commission has been involved in the work of our organisation and its different bodies since the OECD began in 1961, thanks to a protocol to the OECD Convention. Both institutions share common values and aims, including promoting peaceful international co-operation, respect of human dignity, liberty, democracy and equality among our countries and people.

©Adrian Dennis/AFP

If a British referendum on European Union membership scheduled for 23 June led the UK to leave the EU, there would be a severe negative shock to the economy, causing growth to weaken for many years,  an OECD study argues.

You raise the question of whether the euro could one day become a more important international reserve currency (Observer No 230, January 2002). Yet you omit to mention the Panglossian forecasts of some economic commentators a few years back who had predicted a massive shift of international reserves into the euro and out of the dollar–with a consequent surge of the euro.

In October 2014 we wrote that deflationary risks had risen in the euro area and warned of the dangers deflation poses for the economy. Where do we stand now? Has deflation been avoided or has it started to bite? 

The EU’s ban on discarding caught fish in February 2013 has received widespread applause. Why?

The EU’s crisis has as much to do with leadership and solidarity as resolving fiscal and debt problems. It is time to dispense with caricatures and write the next chapter in the EU’s ongoing history. And for that, clear and transparent data will be needed.

©Srdjan Zivulovic/Reuters

The euro area has been at the centre of the global financial storms for two years. Some serious observers have begun to question whether the euro area will survive these currents. The recently published OECD Economic Survey of the Euro Area shows how Europe’s bold experiment in economic integration can be made to work. 

©Deutsche Bank

The new euro architecture that is to come into effect from July still suffers from shortcomings, and problem countries have yet to prove that they can survive within the euro says Thomas Mayer. It would be premature to sound the all clear on the euro crisis. 

European leaders should shift their focus from austerity to growth, not least to fight unemployment, says the ETUC, which urges a Social Progress Protocol to be attached to the European treaties. 

The crisis-induced trend towards inward-looking policies poses great dangers for Europe. 

©Reuters/Albert Gea

Young, skilled, well-educated, well-travelled and yet jobless: these are the characteristics of the so-called “lost generation”. The challenges young people in Europe face today are many, and vary from region to region and from person to person. Many are facing high levels of unemployment; some need to fight for their basic freedoms; others for their right to build up representative youth structures, or face different types of discrimination. There are plenty of indignados out there! 

How can the euro crisis unfold? For David McWilliams, Irish economist and best-selling author, the answer is probably a two-speed arrangement between core and periphery. 

The smooth introduction of euro banknotes and coins will not guarantee the new currency's economic success. That will depend on structural reforms and completing the European single market. 

Economic data

GDP growth: +0.5% Q2 2019 year-on-year
Consumer price inflation: 1.6% September 2019 annual
Trade: -1.9% exp, -0.9% imp, Q2 2019
Unemployment: 5.2% September 2019
Last update: 18 November 2019

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